How to Write a Medical School Personal Statement

How to Write a Medical School Personal Statement

Although you spend hours, even days, composing your medical school personal statement, the admissions committee only reviews it for a period of 3 to 10 minutes. This is why it is critical to make an impact right at the beginning. Your personal statement is like a first impression, although your academic qualifications and other achievements are also taken into consideration. Your personal statement needs to set you apart from the crowd, and there is always a crowd applying to medical school. Understand Why the Personal Statement is Important Over 50% of medical school applicants do not get accepted into their programs of choice. Most of these applicants have average scores or higher on the MCAT, as well as excellent undergraduate grades. However, grades are not all there is to it. Recommendations from professors and physicians play a significant role in the decision process. In the end, however, it is the personal statement that sets you apart from other equally well-qualified applicants. The medical school admissions committee does not want to fill spots with mediocre candidates. Instead, they want to place candidates that will likely succeed in the medical profession, and that success involves dedication and discipline. Consider Your Reason to Attend Although liberal arts graduates who do well in science courses have an equal chance of acceptance when compared with “pre-med” students, medical schools want to see evidence of a real interest in medicine. A genuine interest in this field of study is often due to a genuine interest in people, as medicine is a front row seat at the drama of life.  Oftentimes, altruism motivates medical school applicants....
Personal Statement Example – Medical School

Personal Statement Example – Medical School

Medical School, July 2006 942 words My decision to adopt the lifestyle of medicine was not the stuff of Saturday morning cartoons—no flashing light bulb materialized above my head, nor did a load of bricks fall from the sky and crush me. Medicine has, for as long as I can recall, been as innate to me as composing drafts of this essay right-handed. The earliest queries about my “grown-up” profession were answered by a matter-of-fact “I want to be a pediatrician. That’s a baby doctor.” I could never imagine doing anything else. I wanted to help people who were sick or injured, and I had an avid curiosity about the workings of the human body.   The “B” volume of my family’s World Book Encyclopedia was nearly destroyed by my small hands repeatedly flipping to the ‘Baby’ and ‘Body’ entries, studying the images in an attempt to comprehend pregnancy and birth while puzzling over how those multi-colored organs fit into my own body. Exploration in comparative anatomy began during fishing and hunting trips with my grandparents—cleaning the fish and animals was just as entertaining to me as harvesting them. I wanted to learn more, so I returned to the encyclopedia shelf. Branching out to ‘Bird,’ ‘Dog,’ ‘Ballet,’ and ‘Painting’ quenched a bit of my thirst for more global information, but I never stopped wondering just how the body worked, what happened if something stopped working, and how to fix it. Throughout my childhood, I believed I knew what medicine was, and exactly why I wanted to be a doctor.   Years later, I find myself standing in a cozy...